which tradition do we have here?

During the pojagi class with Chunghie Lee in Feb/March 09, she encouraged creative approaches to the traditions, which is about all I can do anyway, not being Korean but still subject to long traditions in my own culture(s).  I decided to create something very whimsical from scraps of old silk shirts, using mostly just the button plackets, collars, sleeves, and cuffs.  I bridge-stitched the pieces together without turned seams, just butted the already hemmed edges together.  I backed it in purple silk from the same stash of old shirts, and made the traditional wrapper tie from long button plackets with the buttons still on them.  The form is a very traditional Korean wrapping cloth, but the method is a riff on that tradition, echoing the contrasting stitches between pieces, sometimes very improvisationally pieced arrangements, and very colorful.  But the result actually turned out to look more like a Victorian crazy quilt, something I’m only occasionally drawn to in general.  When I shared this piece in the class, everyone including Chunghie, was distinctly underwhelmed.  Ahem.  Okay, either it isn’t very good, or the whimsy of it just appeals to me.  It was great fun to do, in any case.

pojagi wrapper, traditional form, but whimsical style

pojagi wrapper, traditional form, but whimsical style

detail of the pojagi wrapper riff

detail of the pojagi wrapper riff; note contrasting stitching between pieces, a reference to similar technique in pojagi

How a pojagi wrapper is tied when in use

How a pojagi wrapper is tied when in use

learning piece in class, using contrasting silk thread and traditional Korean fabric

a sample learning piece in class, using contrasting silk thread and traditional Korean fabric; handsewn with very close overcast across raw edges of fabric pieces that are ironed out flat afterwards

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: